A profile approach to impulsivity in bipolar disorder: The key role of strong emotions

L. Muhtadie, S. L. Johnson, Charles S Carver, I. H. Gotlib, T. A. Ketter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Bipolar disorder has been associated with elevated impulsivity - a complex construct subsuming multiple facets. We aimed to compare specific facets of impulsivity in bipolar disorder, including those related to key psychological correlates of the illness: reward sensitivity and strong emotion. Method: Ninety-one individuals diagnosed with bipolar I disorder (inter-episode period) and 80 controls completed several well-validated impulsivity measures, including those relevant to reward (Fun-seeking subscale of the Behavioral Activation System scale) and emotion (Positive Urgency and Negative Urgency scales). Results: Bipolar participants reported higher impulsivity scores than did controls on all of the impulsivity measures, except the Fun-seeking subscale of the Behavioral Activation System scale. Positive Urgency - a measure assessing the tendency to act impulsively when experiencing strong positive emotion - yielded the largest group differences: F(1,170) = 78.69, P < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.316. Positive Urgency was also associated with poorer psychosocial functioning in the bipolar group: ΔR2 = 0.24, b = -0.45, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Individuals with bipolar I disorder appear to be at particular risk of behaving impulsively when experiencing strong positive emotions. Findings provide an important first step toward developing a more refined understanding of impulsivity in bipolar disorder with the potential to inform targeted interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-108
Number of pages9
JournalActa Psychiatrica Scandinavica
Volume129
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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Impulsive Behavior
Bipolar Disorder
Emotions
Reward
Psychology

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Emotion
  • Impulsive behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A profile approach to impulsivity in bipolar disorder : The key role of strong emotions. / Muhtadie, L.; Johnson, S. L.; Carver, Charles S; Gotlib, I. H.; Ketter, T. A.

In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Vol. 129, No. 2, 01.02.2014, p. 100-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muhtadie, L. ; Johnson, S. L. ; Carver, Charles S ; Gotlib, I. H. ; Ketter, T. A. / A profile approach to impulsivity in bipolar disorder : The key role of strong emotions. In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 2014 ; Vol. 129, No. 2. pp. 100-108.
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