A practical grading scale for predicting outcome after radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations: Analysis of 1012 treated patients

Robert M. Starke, Chun Po Yen, Dale Ding, Jason P. Sheehan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

169 Scopus citations

Abstract

Object. The authors performed a study to review outcomes following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and to create a practical scale to predict long-term outcome. Methods. Outcomes were reviewed in 1012 patients who were followed up for more than 2 years. Favorable outcome was defined as AVM obliteration and no posttreatment hemorrhage or permanent, symptomatic, radiationinduced complication. Preradiosurgery patient and AVM characteristics predictive of outcome in multivariate analysis were weighted according to their odds ratios to create the Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale. Results. The mean follow-up time was 8 years (range 2-20 years). Arteriovenous malformation obliteration occurred in 69% of patients. Postradiosurgery hemorrhage occurred in 88 patients, for a yearly incidence of 1.14%. Radiation-induced changes occurred in 387 patients (38.2%), symptoms in 100 (9.9%), and permanent deficits in 21 (2.1%). Favorable outcome was achieved in 649 patients (64.1%). The Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale was created such that patients were assigned 1 point each for having an AVM volume of 2-4 cm 3, eloquent AVM location, or a history of hemorrhage, and 2 points for having an AVM volume greater than 4 cm3. Eighty percent of patients who had a score of 0-1 points had a favorable outcome, as did 70% who had a score of 2 points and 45% who had a score of 3-4 points. The Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale was still predictive of outcome after controlling for predictive Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment parameters, including peripheral dose and number of isocenters, in a multivariate analysis. The Spetzler-Martin grading scale and the Radiosurgery-Based Grading Scale predicted favorable outcome, but the Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale provided the best assessment. Conclusions. Gamma Knife radiosurgery can be used to achieve long-term AVM obliteration and neurological preservation in a predictable fashion based on patient and AVM characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)981-987
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of neurosurgery
Volume119
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Arteriovenous malformation
  • Complication
  • Embolization
  • Gamma Knife
  • Grading scale
  • Hemorrhage
  • Outcome
  • Radiosurgery
  • Vascular disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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