A pilot study of maternal sensitivity in the context of emergent autism

Jason K. Baker, Daniel S Messinger, Kara K. Lyons, Caroline J. Grantz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unstructured mother-toddler interactions were examined in 18-month-old high- and low-risk children subsequently diagnosed (n = 12) or not diagnosed (n = 21) with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at 36 months. Differences in maternal sensitivity were not found as a function of emergent ASD status. A differential-susceptibility moderation model of child risk guided investigations linking maternal sensitivity to child behavior and language growth. Group status moderated the relation between sensitivity and concurrent child behavior problems, with a positive association present for children with emergent ASD. Maternal sensitivity at 18 months predicted expressive language growth from age 2 to 3 years among children with emergent ASD only. Findings underscore the importance of understanding parent-child interaction during this key period in the development of autism symptomatology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)988-999
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Mothers
Child Behavior
Child Language
Growth
Language
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Language
  • Parent-child interaction
  • Parenting
  • Risk
  • Sensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

A pilot study of maternal sensitivity in the context of emergent autism. / Baker, Jason K.; Messinger, Daniel S; Lyons, Kara K.; Grantz, Caroline J.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 40, No. 8, 01.08.2010, p. 988-999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baker, Jason K. ; Messinger, Daniel S ; Lyons, Kara K. ; Grantz, Caroline J. / A pilot study of maternal sensitivity in the context of emergent autism. In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2010 ; Vol. 40, No. 8. pp. 988-999.
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