A pilot study of a nurse-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy intervention (Ziphamandla) for adherence and depression in HIV in South Africa

Lena S. Andersen, Jessica F. Magidson, Conall O’Cleirigh, Jessica E. Remmert, Ashraf Kagee, Matthew Leaver, Dan J. Stein, Steven A. Safren, John Joska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Depression is prevalent among people living with HIV in South Africa and interferes with adherence to antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated a nurse-delivered, cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for adherence and depression among antiretroviral therapy users with depression in South Africa (n = 14). Primary outcomes were depression, antiretroviral therapy adherence, feasibility, and acceptability. Findings support robust improvements in mood through a 3-month follow up. Antiretroviral therapy adherence was maintained during the intervention period. Participant retention supports acceptability; however, modest provider fidelity despite intensive supervision warrants additional attention to feasibility. Future effectiveness research is needed to evaluate this nurse-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for adherence and depression in this context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)776-787
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Keywords

  • HIV
  • South Africa
  • adherence
  • cognitive behavioral therapy
  • depression
  • low- and middle-income countries
  • task-sharing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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