A pilot study examining the impact of care provider support program on resiliency, coping, and compassion fatigue in military health care providers

Christopher P. Weidlich, Doris Ugarriza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The Care Provider Support Program (CPSP) was created as a way to improve the resiliency of military health care providers. The purpose of this pilot study was to update what is currently known about the resiliency, coping, and compassion fatigue of military and civilian registered nurses, licensed practical nurses (LPNs), and medics who treat wounded Soldiers and whether these factors can be improved over a sustained period of time. Methods: A prospective cohort pilot study was implemented to investigate the long-term effects of CPSP training on military and civilian nurses, LPNs, and medics (n = 93) at an Army Medical Center utilizing the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, the Ways of Coping Questionnaire, and Professional Quality of Life Questionnaire. Twenty-eight participants returned follow-up questionnaires. Results: CPSP was significant in reducing burnout as measured by the Professional Quality of Life questionnaire, leading to decreased compassion fatigue. CPSP training did not affect resiliency scores on the Connor-Davidson resilience scale or coping scores as measured by the Ways of Coping Questionnaire. Conclusions: on the basis of the results of this study, CPSP training was effective in reducing burnout, which often leads to decreased compassion fatigue in a group of military and civilian registered nurses, LPNs, and medics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)290-295
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume180
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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