A perspective on seawater/frp reinforcement in concrete structures

Adel Younis, Usama Ebead, Antonio Nanni

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Predictions show that more than half of the world population will lack sufficient freshwater by 2025. Yet, the construction industry uses a considerable amount of freshwater to produce concrete. To save resources of fresh water, using seawater seems to be a valid potential alternative that can replace freshwater for mixing concrete. This paper presents a short review performed on existing literature related to the usage of seawater in concrete structures. As a summary of the work presented: (a) It is noticeable that the current literature, generally, reports little or no negative effect of seawater on the characteristics of plain concrete, both in the short and in the long term; (b) steel corrosion caused by the presence of chloride appears to be the sole reason for not accepting the use of seawater in concrete preparation; (c) Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) is discussed as a promising alternative to steel for seawater-concrete reinforcement, owing to their light weight, high tensile strength, and adequate corrosion resistance; and (d) A future outlook for using seawater accompanied by FRP reinforcement in concrete structures is discussed in terms of achieving sustainability goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference
Subtitle of host publicationResilient Structures and Sustainable Construction
PublisherISEC Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780996043748
StatePublished - 2017
Event9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction, ISEC 2017 - Valencia, Spain
Duration: Jul 24 2017Jul 29 2017

Other

Other9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction, ISEC 2017
CountrySpain
CityValencia
Period7/24/177/29/17

Fingerprint

Seawater
Concrete construction
Reinforcement
Concretes
Concrete mixing
Concrete reinforcements
Steel corrosion
Fibers
Polymers
Construction industry
Corrosion resistance
Sustainable development
Tensile strength
Steel
Water

Keywords

  • Chloride threshold limit
  • FRP-reinforced concrete
  • Mixing with saltwater
  • Steel corrosion
  • Sustainable concrete
  • Water shortage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Younis, A., Ebead, U., & Nanni, A. (2017). A perspective on seawater/frp reinforcement in concrete structures. In ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction ISEC Press.

A perspective on seawater/frp reinforcement in concrete structures. / Younis, Adel; Ebead, Usama; Nanni, Antonio.

ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction. ISEC Press, 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Younis, A, Ebead, U & Nanni, A 2017, A perspective on seawater/frp reinforcement in concrete structures. in ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction. ISEC Press, 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction, ISEC 2017, Valencia, Spain, 7/24/17.
Younis A, Ebead U, Nanni A. A perspective on seawater/frp reinforcement in concrete structures. In ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction. ISEC Press. 2017
Younis, Adel ; Ebead, Usama ; Nanni, Antonio. / A perspective on seawater/frp reinforcement in concrete structures. ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction. ISEC Press, 2017.
@inproceedings{690ff435bd6d4b3e855b8be6241b64b2,
title = "A perspective on seawater/frp reinforcement in concrete structures",
abstract = "Predictions show that more than half of the world population will lack sufficient freshwater by 2025. Yet, the construction industry uses a considerable amount of freshwater to produce concrete. To save resources of fresh water, using seawater seems to be a valid potential alternative that can replace freshwater for mixing concrete. This paper presents a short review performed on existing literature related to the usage of seawater in concrete structures. As a summary of the work presented: (a) It is noticeable that the current literature, generally, reports little or no negative effect of seawater on the characteristics of plain concrete, both in the short and in the long term; (b) steel corrosion caused by the presence of chloride appears to be the sole reason for not accepting the use of seawater in concrete preparation; (c) Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) is discussed as a promising alternative to steel for seawater-concrete reinforcement, owing to their light weight, high tensile strength, and adequate corrosion resistance; and (d) A future outlook for using seawater accompanied by FRP reinforcement in concrete structures is discussed in terms of achieving sustainability goals.",
keywords = "Chloride threshold limit, FRP-reinforced concrete, Mixing with saltwater, Steel corrosion, Sustainable concrete, Water shortage",
author = "Adel Younis and Usama Ebead and Antonio Nanni",
year = "2017",
language = "English (US)",
booktitle = "ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference",
publisher = "ISEC Press",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - A perspective on seawater/frp reinforcement in concrete structures

AU - Younis, Adel

AU - Ebead, Usama

AU - Nanni, Antonio

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Predictions show that more than half of the world population will lack sufficient freshwater by 2025. Yet, the construction industry uses a considerable amount of freshwater to produce concrete. To save resources of fresh water, using seawater seems to be a valid potential alternative that can replace freshwater for mixing concrete. This paper presents a short review performed on existing literature related to the usage of seawater in concrete structures. As a summary of the work presented: (a) It is noticeable that the current literature, generally, reports little or no negative effect of seawater on the characteristics of plain concrete, both in the short and in the long term; (b) steel corrosion caused by the presence of chloride appears to be the sole reason for not accepting the use of seawater in concrete preparation; (c) Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) is discussed as a promising alternative to steel for seawater-concrete reinforcement, owing to their light weight, high tensile strength, and adequate corrosion resistance; and (d) A future outlook for using seawater accompanied by FRP reinforcement in concrete structures is discussed in terms of achieving sustainability goals.

AB - Predictions show that more than half of the world population will lack sufficient freshwater by 2025. Yet, the construction industry uses a considerable amount of freshwater to produce concrete. To save resources of fresh water, using seawater seems to be a valid potential alternative that can replace freshwater for mixing concrete. This paper presents a short review performed on existing literature related to the usage of seawater in concrete structures. As a summary of the work presented: (a) It is noticeable that the current literature, generally, reports little or no negative effect of seawater on the characteristics of plain concrete, both in the short and in the long term; (b) steel corrosion caused by the presence of chloride appears to be the sole reason for not accepting the use of seawater in concrete preparation; (c) Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) is discussed as a promising alternative to steel for seawater-concrete reinforcement, owing to their light weight, high tensile strength, and adequate corrosion resistance; and (d) A future outlook for using seawater accompanied by FRP reinforcement in concrete structures is discussed in terms of achieving sustainability goals.

KW - Chloride threshold limit

KW - FRP-reinforced concrete

KW - Mixing with saltwater

KW - Steel corrosion

KW - Sustainable concrete

KW - Water shortage

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85027846165&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85027846165&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference

PB - ISEC Press

ER -