A multicenter United States-Canadian trial to assess lamivudine monotherapy before and after liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis B

R. P. Perrillo, T. Wright, J. Rakela, G. Levy, Eugene R Schiff, R. Gish, Paul Martin, J. Dienstag, P. Adams, R. Dickson, G. Anschuetz, S. Bell, L. Condreay, N. Brown, C. Denham, L. Fuhrman, V. Balan, M. Rosati, L. Lilly, C. RoachA. Statler, B. Chey, L. Goldstein, V. Peacock, K. Dupuis, J. Gaulthier

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Abstract

Seventy-seven liver transplant candidates were enrolled in a multicenter study in which patients were treated with lamivudine (100 mg daily) without the adjunctive use of hepatitis B immune globulin. Treatment was begun while patients awaited liver transplantation and continued after transplantation. All were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBesAg) positive, and 61% had detectable hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and HBV DNA when treatment was begun. Forty-seven underwent liver transplantation and 30 did not. Median study participation was 38 months (range, 2.7-48.5) in the transplanted patients and 26 months (range, 0.1-37) in the nontransplanted group. Twenty-five of 42 (60%) transplanted patients with 12 or more weeks of posttransplantation follow-up were HBsAg negative at the last study visit. At treatment week 156, 13 of 22 (59%) remained HBsAg negative, and all 9 reinfected patients were HBV-DNA positive before treatment. In the nontransplanted patients, HBeAg was initially detectable in 20 of 27 (74%) but this decreased to 3 of 17 (18%) after 104 weeks of treatment, and significant improvement in biochemical parameters was observed. HBV-DNA polymerase mutants were detected in 15 (21%) and 6 (20%) of the transplanted and nontransplanted patients, respectively. When compared with historical cohorts, lamivudine-treated patients appeared to have improved survival, and transplanted patients had a decrease in the rate of recurrent HBV infection. Lamivudine therapy was partially effective in preventing recurrent HBV infection when given before and after transplantation. Thus, future trials using a Combination of HBIg and lamivudine are needed to assess the optimal prophylactic therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)424-432
Number of pages9
JournalHepatology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2001

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Lamivudine
Chronic Hepatitis B
Liver Transplantation
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Hepatitis B e Antigens
Therapeutics
Transplantation
DNA
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Infection
Hepatitis B
Multicenter Studies
Immunoglobulins
Transplants
Survival
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

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A multicenter United States-Canadian trial to assess lamivudine monotherapy before and after liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis B. / Perrillo, R. P.; Wright, T.; Rakela, J.; Levy, G.; Schiff, Eugene R; Gish, R.; Martin, Paul; Dienstag, J.; Adams, P.; Dickson, R.; Anschuetz, G.; Bell, S.; Condreay, L.; Brown, N.; Denham, C.; Fuhrman, L.; Balan, V.; Rosati, M.; Lilly, L.; Roach, C.; Statler, A.; Chey, B.; Goldstein, L.; Peacock, V.; Dupuis, K.; Gaulthier, J.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 33, No. 2, 15.02.2001, p. 424-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perrillo, RP, Wright, T, Rakela, J, Levy, G, Schiff, ER, Gish, R, Martin, P, Dienstag, J, Adams, P, Dickson, R, Anschuetz, G, Bell, S, Condreay, L, Brown, N, Denham, C, Fuhrman, L, Balan, V, Rosati, M, Lilly, L, Roach, C, Statler, A, Chey, B, Goldstein, L, Peacock, V, Dupuis, K & Gaulthier, J 2001, 'A multicenter United States-Canadian trial to assess lamivudine monotherapy before and after liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis B', Hepatology, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 424-432. https://doi.org/10.1053/jhep.2001.21554
Perrillo, R. P. ; Wright, T. ; Rakela, J. ; Levy, G. ; Schiff, Eugene R ; Gish, R. ; Martin, Paul ; Dienstag, J. ; Adams, P. ; Dickson, R. ; Anschuetz, G. ; Bell, S. ; Condreay, L. ; Brown, N. ; Denham, C. ; Fuhrman, L. ; Balan, V. ; Rosati, M. ; Lilly, L. ; Roach, C. ; Statler, A. ; Chey, B. ; Goldstein, L. ; Peacock, V. ; Dupuis, K. ; Gaulthier, J. / A multicenter United States-Canadian trial to assess lamivudine monotherapy before and after liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis B. In: Hepatology. 2001 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 424-432.
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abstract = "Seventy-seven liver transplant candidates were enrolled in a multicenter study in which patients were treated with lamivudine (100 mg daily) without the adjunctive use of hepatitis B immune globulin. Treatment was begun while patients awaited liver transplantation and continued after transplantation. All were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBesAg) positive, and 61{\%} had detectable hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and HBV DNA when treatment was begun. Forty-seven underwent liver transplantation and 30 did not. Median study participation was 38 months (range, 2.7-48.5) in the transplanted patients and 26 months (range, 0.1-37) in the nontransplanted group. Twenty-five of 42 (60{\%}) transplanted patients with 12 or more weeks of posttransplantation follow-up were HBsAg negative at the last study visit. At treatment week 156, 13 of 22 (59{\%}) remained HBsAg negative, and all 9 reinfected patients were HBV-DNA positive before treatment. In the nontransplanted patients, HBeAg was initially detectable in 20 of 27 (74{\%}) but this decreased to 3 of 17 (18{\%}) after 104 weeks of treatment, and significant improvement in biochemical parameters was observed. HBV-DNA polymerase mutants were detected in 15 (21{\%}) and 6 (20{\%}) of the transplanted and nontransplanted patients, respectively. When compared with historical cohorts, lamivudine-treated patients appeared to have improved survival, and transplanted patients had a decrease in the rate of recurrent HBV infection. Lamivudine therapy was partially effective in preventing recurrent HBV infection when given before and after transplantation. Thus, future trials using a Combination of HBIg and lamivudine are needed to assess the optimal prophylactic therapy.",
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T1 - A multicenter United States-Canadian trial to assess lamivudine monotherapy before and after liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis B

AU - Perrillo, R. P.

AU - Wright, T.

AU - Rakela, J.

AU - Levy, G.

AU - Schiff, Eugene R

AU - Gish, R.

AU - Martin, Paul

AU - Dienstag, J.

AU - Adams, P.

AU - Dickson, R.

AU - Anschuetz, G.

AU - Bell, S.

AU - Condreay, L.

AU - Brown, N.

AU - Denham, C.

AU - Fuhrman, L.

AU - Balan, V.

AU - Rosati, M.

AU - Lilly, L.

AU - Roach, C.

AU - Statler, A.

AU - Chey, B.

AU - Goldstein, L.

AU - Peacock, V.

AU - Dupuis, K.

AU - Gaulthier, J.

PY - 2001/2/15

Y1 - 2001/2/15

N2 - Seventy-seven liver transplant candidates were enrolled in a multicenter study in which patients were treated with lamivudine (100 mg daily) without the adjunctive use of hepatitis B immune globulin. Treatment was begun while patients awaited liver transplantation and continued after transplantation. All were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBesAg) positive, and 61% had detectable hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and HBV DNA when treatment was begun. Forty-seven underwent liver transplantation and 30 did not. Median study participation was 38 months (range, 2.7-48.5) in the transplanted patients and 26 months (range, 0.1-37) in the nontransplanted group. Twenty-five of 42 (60%) transplanted patients with 12 or more weeks of posttransplantation follow-up were HBsAg negative at the last study visit. At treatment week 156, 13 of 22 (59%) remained HBsAg negative, and all 9 reinfected patients were HBV-DNA positive before treatment. In the nontransplanted patients, HBeAg was initially detectable in 20 of 27 (74%) but this decreased to 3 of 17 (18%) after 104 weeks of treatment, and significant improvement in biochemical parameters was observed. HBV-DNA polymerase mutants were detected in 15 (21%) and 6 (20%) of the transplanted and nontransplanted patients, respectively. When compared with historical cohorts, lamivudine-treated patients appeared to have improved survival, and transplanted patients had a decrease in the rate of recurrent HBV infection. Lamivudine therapy was partially effective in preventing recurrent HBV infection when given before and after transplantation. Thus, future trials using a Combination of HBIg and lamivudine are needed to assess the optimal prophylactic therapy.

AB - Seventy-seven liver transplant candidates were enrolled in a multicenter study in which patients were treated with lamivudine (100 mg daily) without the adjunctive use of hepatitis B immune globulin. Treatment was begun while patients awaited liver transplantation and continued after transplantation. All were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBesAg) positive, and 61% had detectable hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and HBV DNA when treatment was begun. Forty-seven underwent liver transplantation and 30 did not. Median study participation was 38 months (range, 2.7-48.5) in the transplanted patients and 26 months (range, 0.1-37) in the nontransplanted group. Twenty-five of 42 (60%) transplanted patients with 12 or more weeks of posttransplantation follow-up were HBsAg negative at the last study visit. At treatment week 156, 13 of 22 (59%) remained HBsAg negative, and all 9 reinfected patients were HBV-DNA positive before treatment. In the nontransplanted patients, HBeAg was initially detectable in 20 of 27 (74%) but this decreased to 3 of 17 (18%) after 104 weeks of treatment, and significant improvement in biochemical parameters was observed. HBV-DNA polymerase mutants were detected in 15 (21%) and 6 (20%) of the transplanted and nontransplanted patients, respectively. When compared with historical cohorts, lamivudine-treated patients appeared to have improved survival, and transplanted patients had a decrease in the rate of recurrent HBV infection. Lamivudine therapy was partially effective in preventing recurrent HBV infection when given before and after transplantation. Thus, future trials using a Combination of HBIg and lamivudine are needed to assess the optimal prophylactic therapy.

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