A more accurate method to estimate glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine: A new prediction equation

Andrew S. Levey, Juan P. Bosch, Julia Breyer Lewis, Tom Greene, Nancy Rogers, David Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11381 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Serum creatinine concentration is widely used as an index of renal function, but this concentration is affected by factors other than glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Objective: To develop an equation to predict GFR from serum creatinine concentration and other factors. Design: Cross-sectional study of GFR, creatinine clearance, serum creatinine concentration, and demographic and clinical characteristics in patients with chronic renal disease. Patients: 1628 patients enrolled in the baseline period of the Modification of Diet, in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study, of whom 1070 were randomly selected as the training sample; the remaining 558 patients constituted the validation sample. Methods: The prediction equation was developed by stepwise regression applied to the training sample. The equation was then tested and compared with other prediction equations in the validation sample. Results: To simplify prediction of GFR, the equation included only demographic and serum variables. Independent factors associated with a lower GFR included a higher serum creatinine concentration, older age, female sex, nonblack ethnicity, higher serum urea nitrogen levels, and lower serum albumin levels (P < 0.001 for all factors). The multiple regression model explained 90.3% of the variance in the logarithm of GFR in the validation sample. Measured creatinine clearance overestimated GFR by 19%, and creatinine clearance predicted by the Cockcroft-Gault formula overestimated GFR by 16%. After adjustment for this overestimation, the percentage of variance of the logarithm of GFR predicted by measured creatinine clearance or the Cockcroft-Gault formula was 86.6% and 84.2%, respectively. Conclusion: The equation developed from the MDRD Study provided a more accurate estimate of GFR in our study group than measured creatinine clearance or other commonly used equations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-470
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume130
Issue number6
StatePublished - Mar 16 1999

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Glomerular Filtration Rate
Creatinine
Serum
Diet Therapy
Kidney
Demography
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Serum Albumin
Urea
Nitrogen
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A more accurate method to estimate glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine : A new prediction equation. / Levey, Andrew S.; Bosch, Juan P.; Lewis, Julia Breyer; Greene, Tom; Rogers, Nancy; Roth, David.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 130, No. 6, 16.03.1999, p. 461-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levey, Andrew S. ; Bosch, Juan P. ; Lewis, Julia Breyer ; Greene, Tom ; Rogers, Nancy ; Roth, David. / A more accurate method to estimate glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine : A new prediction equation. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 130, No. 6. pp. 461-470.
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