A longitudinal study of paternal and maternal involvement and neighborhood risk on recent immigrant Latino/a youth prosocial behaviors

Alexandra N. Davis, Gustavo Carlo, Sahitya Maiya, Seth J. Schwartz, Jose Szapocznik, Sabrina Des Rosiers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The goal of the current study was to examine the role of neighborhood risk and maternal and paternal involvement on multiple forms of prosocial behaviors among recent immigrant US Latino/a adolescents. Additionally, we examined the interactions between parental involvement and neighborhood risk in order to test protective effects of mothers’ and fathers’ involvement. Participants were 302 adolescents (53.3% male, Mage = 14.51 years, range = 13–17) and their primary caregiver. Data were collected from adolescents in two US cities: Los Angeles (n = 150) and Miami (n = 152). The results demonstrated that maternal involvement was positively associated with emotional, dire, compliant, and anonymous prosocial behaviors. Paternal involvement was positively associated with emotional prosocial behaviors, but this result became non-significant when maternal involvement was also included in the model. While there were no direct links between neighborhood risk and prosocial behaviors, compliant helping increased only when neighborhood risk increased and paternal involvement decreased. Discussion focuses on the role of multiple influences in shaping prosocial behaviors among immigrant youth, with a focus on parental involvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-30
Number of pages18
JournalNew Directions for Child and Adolescent Development
Volume2021
Issue number177
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • US Latino/a families
  • immigrant youth
  • maternal involvement
  • neighborhood risk
  • paternal involvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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