A longitudinal assessment of autologous neutralizing antibodies in children perinatally infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1

Rebeca Geffin, Cecelia Hutto, Carole Andrew, Gwendolyn B Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The evolution of autologous neutralizing antibodies to sequential human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-I) isolates was studied in a population of 16 children who were perinatally infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. The cohort included seven children with rapid disease progression (RP) and nine who had nonrapid disease progression (NRP). Four of the NRP after 6 months of age harbored viruses that could be neutralized by antibodies found in autologous contemporaneous plasma (titers up to 1:640) while the majority of longitudinally collected viruses from five NRP were resistant to neutralization with contemporaneous plasma. Because of their shorter survival, only five of the RP had studies after 6 months of age; three of the five had neutralizing antibodies to contemporaneous virus isolates and the highest titers were 1:20. The highest titers in RP (up to 1:160) occurred in specimens obtained prior to 6 months of age but these were most likely of maternal origin. Most isolates that were not neutralized by contemporaneous plasma could be neutralized using noncontemporaneous plasma obtained months to years after the virus isolates. These autologous noncontemporaneous neutralizing antibodies persisted for years, had titers that were higher to viruses isolated at younger ages, and were generally more potent in children with NRP than RP. Demonstration of neutralizing antibodies to viruses previously resistant to neutralization by contemporaneous plasma suggests a continuous evolution of virus variants in vivo that are able to escape the effect of neutralizing antibodies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-215
Number of pages9
JournalVirology
Volume310
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 5 2003

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Neutralizing Antibodies
Disease Progression
HIV-1
Viruses
Mothers
Antibodies
Population

Keywords

  • Antibodies
  • HIV
  • Immune response
  • Neutralization
  • Neutralization escape
  • Perinatal infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

A longitudinal assessment of autologous neutralizing antibodies in children perinatally infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. / Geffin, Rebeca; Hutto, Cecelia; Andrew, Carole; Scott, Gwendolyn B.

In: Virology, Vol. 310, No. 2, 05.06.2003, p. 207-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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