A long-term, multicenter, open-label study of risperidone in elderly patients with psychosis

M. Davidson, Philip D Harvey, J. Vervarcke, C. A. Gagiano, J. D. De Hooge, G. Bray, M. Dose, Y. Barak, M. Haushofer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale. Studies have shown that risperidone is safe and efficacious in young and middle-aged adults with chronic schizophrenia, but considerably fewer data are available on the treatment of elderly patients with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders, particularly long-term outcomes. Objective. A 12-month, open-label study was conducted to assess the effects of risperidone in elderly, chronically ill, psychotic patients. Methods. This study enrolled 180 elderly, chronically ill, psychotic patients (median age, 72 years [range 54-89]), 97 of whom completed the 12-month study. At endpoint, the mean dose of risperidone was 3.7 mg/day. Results. Clinical improvement (≥ 20% reduction in Positive and Negative Syndrome Score [PANSS] total score) was achieved by 54% of patients at endpoint. There were significant reductions in PANSS total, subscale (positive, negative, and general psychopathology), and cognition cluster scores at endpoint (p < 0.001). Clinical Global Impressions severity of illness scores showed continued improvement through month 12 (p < 0.001). In contrast, PANSS data from a historical comparable control group of patients receiving conventional antipsychotic agents showed no symptom improvement over a 12-month treatment period. The severity of preexisting extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in patients treated with risperidone decreased significantly from baseline to endpoint (p < 0.001), and the use of antiparkinsonian medication decreased from 41.1% of patients before the trial to 25.6% during the trial. There were no spontaneous reports of tardive dyskinesia (TD) and the incidence of assessed TD was 4.3% in contrast to the expected 26% reported in middle-aged and elderly patients receiving conventional antipsychotic agents for 1 year. Conclusions. Long-term treatment with risperidone was associated with continued symptom improvement, a decrease in the severity of preexisting EPS, and a low incidence of TD in elderly psychotic patients. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)506-514
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Risperidone
Psychotic Disorders
Antipsychotic Agents
Schizophrenia
Chronic Disease
Antiparkinson Agents
Incidence
Psychopathology
Cognition
Therapeutics
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Efficacy
  • Elderly
  • Psychosis
  • Risperidone
  • Safety
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A long-term, multicenter, open-label study of risperidone in elderly patients with psychosis. / Davidson, M.; Harvey, Philip D; Vervarcke, J.; Gagiano, C. A.; De Hooge, J. D.; Bray, G.; Dose, M.; Barak, Y.; Haushofer, M.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 15, No. 6, 01.06.2000, p. 506-514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davidson, M. ; Harvey, Philip D ; Vervarcke, J. ; Gagiano, C. A. ; De Hooge, J. D. ; Bray, G. ; Dose, M. ; Barak, Y. ; Haushofer, M. / A long-term, multicenter, open-label study of risperidone in elderly patients with psychosis. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2000 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 506-514.
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