A highly compliant serpentine shaped polyimide interconnect for front-end strain relief in chronic neural implants

Viswanath Sankar, Justin C. Sanchez, Edward McCumiskey, Nagid Brown, Curtis R. Taylor, Gregory J. Ehlert, Henry A. Sodano, Toshikazu Nishida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While the signal quality of recording neural electrodes is observed to degrade over time, the degradation mechanisms are complex and less easily observable. Recording microelectrodes failures are attributed to different biological factors such as tissue encapsulation, immune response, and disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and non-biological factors such as strain due to micromotion, insulation delamination, corrosion, and surface roughness on the recording site (1-4). Strain due to brain micromotion is considered to be one of the important abiotic factors contributing to the failure of the neural implants. To reduce the forces exerted by the electrode on the brain, a high compliance 2D serpentine shaped electrode cable was designed, simulated, and measured using polyimide as the substrate material. Serpentine electrode cables were fabricated using MEMS microfabrication techniques, and the prototypes were subjected to load tests to experimentally measure the compliance. The compliance of the serpentine cable was numerically modeled and quantitatively measured to be up to 10 times higher than the compliance of a straight cable of same dimensions and material.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberArticle 124
JournalFrontiers in Neurology
Volume4 SEP
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 16 2013

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Compliance
Electrodes
Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems
Microtechnology
Corrosion
Brain
Biological Factors
Microelectrodes
Blood-Brain Barrier

Keywords

  • Brain-machine interface
  • Flexible microelectrode array
  • High compliance electrode cable
  • Neuroprosthetics
  • Strain relief

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Sankar, V., Sanchez, J. C., McCumiskey, E., Brown, N., Taylor, C. R., Ehlert, G. J., ... Nishida, T. (2013). A highly compliant serpentine shaped polyimide interconnect for front-end strain relief in chronic neural implants. Frontiers in Neurology, 4 SEP, [Article 124]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2013.00124

A highly compliant serpentine shaped polyimide interconnect for front-end strain relief in chronic neural implants. / Sankar, Viswanath; Sanchez, Justin C.; McCumiskey, Edward; Brown, Nagid; Taylor, Curtis R.; Ehlert, Gregory J.; Sodano, Henry A.; Nishida, Toshikazu.

In: Frontiers in Neurology, Vol. 4 SEP, Article 124, 16.10.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sankar, V, Sanchez, JC, McCumiskey, E, Brown, N, Taylor, CR, Ehlert, GJ, Sodano, HA & Nishida, T 2013, 'A highly compliant serpentine shaped polyimide interconnect for front-end strain relief in chronic neural implants', Frontiers in Neurology, vol. 4 SEP, Article 124. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2013.00124
Sankar, Viswanath ; Sanchez, Justin C. ; McCumiskey, Edward ; Brown, Nagid ; Taylor, Curtis R. ; Ehlert, Gregory J. ; Sodano, Henry A. ; Nishida, Toshikazu. / A highly compliant serpentine shaped polyimide interconnect for front-end strain relief in chronic neural implants. In: Frontiers in Neurology. 2013 ; Vol. 4 SEP.
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