A gene for dihydrofolate reductase in a herpesvirus

J. J. Trimble, S. C S Murthy, A. Bakker, R. Grassmann, Ronald Charles Desrosiers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is found ubiquitously in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It is essential for de novo synthesis of purines and of deoxythymidine monophosphate for DNA synthesis. Among viruses, however, only the T-even and T5 bacteriophage have been found to encode their own DHFR. In this study a gene for DHFR was found in a specific subgroup of the gamma or lymphotropic class of herpesviruses. DNA sequences for DHFR were found in herpesvirus saimiri and herpesvirus ateles but not in Epstein-Barr virus, Marek's disease virus, herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, herpesvirus tamarinus, or human cytomegalovirus. The predicted sequence of herpesvirus saimiri DHFR is 186 amino acids in length, the same length as human, murine, and bovine DHFR. The human and herpesvirus saimiri DHFRs share 83 percent positional identity in amino acid sequence. The herpesvirus saimiri DHFR gene is devoid of intron sequences, suggesting that it was acquired by some process involving reverse transcription. This is to our knowledge the first example of mammalian virus with a gene for DHFR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1145-1147
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume239
Issue number4844
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase
Herpesviridae
Saimiriine Herpesvirus 2
Genes
Viruses
Rhadinovirus
Marek Disease
Purines
Human Herpesvirus 3
Virus Diseases
Simplexvirus
Eukaryota
Cytomegalovirus
Human Herpesvirus 4
Bacteriophages
Thymidine
Introns
Reverse Transcription
Amino Acid Sequence
Amino Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Trimble, J. J., Murthy, S. C. S., Bakker, A., Grassmann, R., & Desrosiers, R. C. (1988). A gene for dihydrofolate reductase in a herpesvirus. Science, 239(4844), 1145-1147.

A gene for dihydrofolate reductase in a herpesvirus. / Trimble, J. J.; Murthy, S. C S; Bakker, A.; Grassmann, R.; Desrosiers, Ronald Charles.

In: Science, Vol. 239, No. 4844, 1988, p. 1145-1147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trimble, JJ, Murthy, SCS, Bakker, A, Grassmann, R & Desrosiers, RC 1988, 'A gene for dihydrofolate reductase in a herpesvirus', Science, vol. 239, no. 4844, pp. 1145-1147.
Trimble JJ, Murthy SCS, Bakker A, Grassmann R, Desrosiers RC. A gene for dihydrofolate reductase in a herpesvirus. Science. 1988;239(4844):1145-1147.
Trimble, J. J. ; Murthy, S. C S ; Bakker, A. ; Grassmann, R. ; Desrosiers, Ronald Charles. / A gene for dihydrofolate reductase in a herpesvirus. In: Science. 1988 ; Vol. 239, No. 4844. pp. 1145-1147.
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