A gender comparison of central and peripheral neuromuscular function after exercise

Ashley Stern, Chris Kuenze, Daniel Herman, Lindsay D. Sauer, Joseph M. Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Central and peripheral muscle fatigue during exercise may exacerbate neuromuscular factors that increase risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To compare lower extremity motorevoked potentials (MEPs), muscle strength, and electromyography (EMG) activation after an exercise protocol. Design: Pretest, posttest group comparison. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: 34 healthy volunteers (17 female, age = 21.9 ± 2.3 years, weight = 77.8 ± 3.0 kg, height = 171.1 ± 6.6 cm, and 17 male, age = 23.4 ± 6.5 years, weight = 81.6 ± 3.3 kg, height = 179.6 ± 7.3 cm). Intervention: A standardized 30-min exercise protocol that involved 5 repeated cycles of uphill walking, body-weight squatting, and step-ups. Main Outcome Measures: Quadriceps and hamstring MEP amplitude (mV) and transmission velocity normalized to subject height (m/s) were elicited via transcranial magnetic stimulation and measured via surface EMG. Quadriceps and hamstring peak EMG activation (% MVIC) and peak torque (Nm/kg) were measured during MVICs. Separate ANCOVAs were used to compare groups after exercise while controlling for baseline measurement. Results: At baseline, males exhibited significantly greater knee-extension torques (males = 2.47 ± 0.68 Nm/ kg, females = 1.95 ± 0.53 Nm/kg; P = .036) and significantly higher hamstring MEP amplitudes (males = 223.5 ± 134.0 mV, females = 89.3 ± 77.6 mV; P = .007). Males exhibited greater quadriceps MEP amplitude after exercise than females (males = 127.2 ± 112.7 mV, females = 32.3 ± 34.9 mV; P = .016). Conclusions: Males experienced greater peripheral neuromuscular changes manifested as more pronounced reductions in quadriceps torque after exercise. Females experienced greater central neuromuscular changes manifested as more pronounced reduction in quadriceps MEP amplitude. Reduced central neural drive of the quadriceps coupled with knee-extension torque preservation after exercise may increase risk of knee injury in females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-217
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume21
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Exercise
Torque
Electromyography
Knee
Weights and Measures
Knee Injuries
Muscle Fatigue
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Muscle Strength
Walking
Lower Extremity
Healthy Volunteers
Body Weight
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Fatigue
  • Knee joint
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Stern, A., Kuenze, C., Herman, D., Sauer, L. D., & Hart, J. M. (2012). A gender comparison of central and peripheral neuromuscular function after exercise. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, 21(3), 209-217.

A gender comparison of central and peripheral neuromuscular function after exercise. / Stern, Ashley; Kuenze, Chris; Herman, Daniel; Sauer, Lindsay D.; Hart, Joseph M.

In: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2012, p. 209-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stern, A, Kuenze, C, Herman, D, Sauer, LD & Hart, JM 2012, 'A gender comparison of central and peripheral neuromuscular function after exercise', Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 209-217.
Stern, Ashley ; Kuenze, Chris ; Herman, Daniel ; Sauer, Lindsay D. ; Hart, Joseph M. / A gender comparison of central and peripheral neuromuscular function after exercise. In: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 209-217.
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N2 - Context: Central and peripheral muscle fatigue during exercise may exacerbate neuromuscular factors that increase risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To compare lower extremity motorevoked potentials (MEPs), muscle strength, and electromyography (EMG) activation after an exercise protocol. Design: Pretest, posttest group comparison. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: 34 healthy volunteers (17 female, age = 21.9 ± 2.3 years, weight = 77.8 ± 3.0 kg, height = 171.1 ± 6.6 cm, and 17 male, age = 23.4 ± 6.5 years, weight = 81.6 ± 3.3 kg, height = 179.6 ± 7.3 cm). Intervention: A standardized 30-min exercise protocol that involved 5 repeated cycles of uphill walking, body-weight squatting, and step-ups. Main Outcome Measures: Quadriceps and hamstring MEP amplitude (mV) and transmission velocity normalized to subject height (m/s) were elicited via transcranial magnetic stimulation and measured via surface EMG. Quadriceps and hamstring peak EMG activation (% MVIC) and peak torque (Nm/kg) were measured during MVICs. Separate ANCOVAs were used to compare groups after exercise while controlling for baseline measurement. Results: At baseline, males exhibited significantly greater knee-extension torques (males = 2.47 ± 0.68 Nm/ kg, females = 1.95 ± 0.53 Nm/kg; P = .036) and significantly higher hamstring MEP amplitudes (males = 223.5 ± 134.0 mV, females = 89.3 ± 77.6 mV; P = .007). Males exhibited greater quadriceps MEP amplitude after exercise than females (males = 127.2 ± 112.7 mV, females = 32.3 ± 34.9 mV; P = .016). Conclusions: Males experienced greater peripheral neuromuscular changes manifested as more pronounced reductions in quadriceps torque after exercise. Females experienced greater central neuromuscular changes manifested as more pronounced reduction in quadriceps MEP amplitude. Reduced central neural drive of the quadriceps coupled with knee-extension torque preservation after exercise may increase risk of knee injury in females.

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