A DECADE OF DECLINING WELFARE PARTICIPATION: SORTING OUT THE CAUSES

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since the late 1970s, the proportion of all single‐parent families receiving benefits from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program has been declining. This is reversing an earlier two‐decade trend. This paper uses data from the Current Population Survey so as to investigate the reasons for the decline. The analysis reveals that for the years prior to 1981, the decline has resulted both from an erosion in real AFDC guarantee levels–caused by high rates of inflation–and from changes in demographic conditions. For the years subsequent to 1981, the decline has resulted from an increase in effective AFDC benefit reduction rates caused by the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1981. Somewhat offsetting the participation rate decline were falling real child support collections and a rising unemployment rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-123
Number of pages14
JournalContemporary Economic Policy
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

welfare
participation
cause
child benefit
children's program
unemployment rate
reconciliation
erosion
guarantee
act
Participation
Sorting
trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Public Administration

Cite this

A DECADE OF DECLINING WELFARE PARTICIPATION : SORTING OUT THE CAUSES. / Robins, Philip.

In: Contemporary Economic Policy, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.01.1990, p. 110-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b35644777c614a54b3b12267f597657a,
title = "A DECADE OF DECLINING WELFARE PARTICIPATION: SORTING OUT THE CAUSES",
abstract = "Since the late 1970s, the proportion of all single‐parent families receiving benefits from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program has been declining. This is reversing an earlier two‐decade trend. This paper uses data from the Current Population Survey so as to investigate the reasons for the decline. The analysis reveals that for the years prior to 1981, the decline has resulted both from an erosion in real AFDC guarantee levels–caused by high rates of inflation–and from changes in demographic conditions. For the years subsequent to 1981, the decline has resulted from an increase in effective AFDC benefit reduction rates caused by the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1981. Somewhat offsetting the participation rate decline were falling real child support collections and a rising unemployment rate.",
author = "Philip Robins",
year = "1990",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1465-7287.1990.tb00585.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "110--123",
journal = "Contemporary Economic Policy",
issn = "1074-3529",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A DECADE OF DECLINING WELFARE PARTICIPATION

T2 - SORTING OUT THE CAUSES

AU - Robins, Philip

PY - 1990/1/1

Y1 - 1990/1/1

N2 - Since the late 1970s, the proportion of all single‐parent families receiving benefits from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program has been declining. This is reversing an earlier two‐decade trend. This paper uses data from the Current Population Survey so as to investigate the reasons for the decline. The analysis reveals that for the years prior to 1981, the decline has resulted both from an erosion in real AFDC guarantee levels–caused by high rates of inflation–and from changes in demographic conditions. For the years subsequent to 1981, the decline has resulted from an increase in effective AFDC benefit reduction rates caused by the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1981. Somewhat offsetting the participation rate decline were falling real child support collections and a rising unemployment rate.

AB - Since the late 1970s, the proportion of all single‐parent families receiving benefits from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program has been declining. This is reversing an earlier two‐decade trend. This paper uses data from the Current Population Survey so as to investigate the reasons for the decline. The analysis reveals that for the years prior to 1981, the decline has resulted both from an erosion in real AFDC guarantee levels–caused by high rates of inflation–and from changes in demographic conditions. For the years subsequent to 1981, the decline has resulted from an increase in effective AFDC benefit reduction rates caused by the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1981. Somewhat offsetting the participation rate decline were falling real child support collections and a rising unemployment rate.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85005016661&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85005016661&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1465-7287.1990.tb00585.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1465-7287.1990.tb00585.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85005016661

VL - 8

SP - 110

EP - 123

JO - Contemporary Economic Policy

JF - Contemporary Economic Policy

SN - 1074-3529

IS - 1

ER -