A crossover trial of high and low sucrose-carbohydrate diets in type II diabetics with hypertriglyceridemia.

M. A. Emanuele, C. Abraira, W. S. Jellish, M. DeBartolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Earlier work shows that hyperlipemic type II diabetics tolerate wide ranges of sucrose and carbohydrate intake without effects on glycemic control, but a rise of fasting serum triglycerides sometimes occurs. To address further the issue of individual susceptibility to carbohydrate, the current study was designed to use each patient as his own control when given diets widely varying in sucrose content. After a stabilization period in the hospital on a normal sucrose content diet, each subject was given either a very low sucrose (less than 3 gm/day)-low carbohydrate (38 +/- 2%) diet or a high sucrose (220 gm)-high carbohydrate (63 +/- 3%) diet for 4 weeks. On a separate admission the opposite diet was assessed, again after an initial normal sucrose content diet. No consistent differences occurred in serum glucose levels or in 24-hr urinary glycosuria. High sucrose-carbohydrate intake raised fasting hypertriglyceridemia after 2 weeks but less thereafter. Severe sucrose-carbohydrate restriction did not significantly decrease fasting serum triglycerides; postprandial triglycerides changed in a trend opposite to fasting levels. No differences occurred in fasting serum insulin or serum cholesterol levels, but postprandial insulin levels were higher in high sucrose-carbohydrate diets. A diet with low sucrose and low total carbohydrate appears to offer no improvement in glycemic control over at least 70-fold higher dietary sucrose levels. However, high sucrose and carbohydrate diets increase fasting triglyceride levels in hypertriglyceridemic type II diabetics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429-437
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume5
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet
hypertriglyceridemia
Hypertriglyceridemia
Cross-Over Studies
Sucrose
sucrose
carbohydrates
Carbohydrates
Diet
diet
Fasting
fasting
Triglycerides
triacylglycerols
Serum
glycemic control
carbohydrate intake
cross-over studies
Dietary Sucrose
insulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A crossover trial of high and low sucrose-carbohydrate diets in type II diabetics with hypertriglyceridemia. / Emanuele, M. A.; Abraira, C.; Jellish, W. S.; DeBartolo, M.

In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 5, No. 5, 01.01.1986, p. 429-437.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Emanuele, M. A. ; Abraira, C. ; Jellish, W. S. ; DeBartolo, M. / A crossover trial of high and low sucrose-carbohydrate diets in type II diabetics with hypertriglyceridemia. In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 1986 ; Vol. 5, No. 5. pp. 429-437.
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