A continuous record of Florida Current temperature transport at 27°N

D. R. Shoosmith, M. O. Baringer, William E Johns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As part of a newly funded international program to monitor ocean heat transport at mid-latitudes in the North Atlantic, a continuous estimate of the temperature transport of the Florida Current is required. Since 1982, volume transports have been inferred from voltage measurements monitored by submarine telephone cables across the Straits of Florida. Electromagnetic induction theory suggests that the cable voltage should actually give a more direct measure of conductivity transport than pure volume transport. Due to the strong dependence of conductivity on temperature, this would in theory result in a direct and continuous estimate of the Florida Current temperature transport. This hypothesis is investigated using data from a large number of temperature and velocity sections (58) across the Florida Current at the cable location, leading to a new calibration of the voltage signal for the temperature transport of th Florida Current, crucial for trans-basin heat flux estimates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberL23603
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume32
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 16 2005

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cable
cables
volume transport
temperature
conductivity
estimates
straits
telephones
electric potential
electrical measurement
heat flux
strait
induction
oceans
electromagnetism
calibration
heat
ocean
basin
programme

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A continuous record of Florida Current temperature transport at 27°N. / Shoosmith, D. R.; Baringer, M. O.; Johns, William E.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 32, No. 23, L23603, 16.12.2005, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shoosmith, D. R. ; Baringer, M. O. ; Johns, William E. / A continuous record of Florida Current temperature transport at 27°N. In: Geophysical Research Letters. 2005 ; Vol. 32, No. 23. pp. 1-5.
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