A confirmatory study of rating scale category effectiveness for the coaching efficacy scale

Nicholas Myers, Deborah L. Feltz, Edward W. Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study extended validity evidence for measures of coaching efficacy derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES) by testing the rating scale categorizations suggested in previous research. Previous research provided evidence for the effectiveness of a four-category (4-CAT) structure for high school and collegiate sports coaches; it also suggested that a five-category (5-CAT) structure may be effective for youth sports coaches, because they may be more likely to endorse categories on the lower end of the scale. Coaches of youth sports (N= 492) responded to the CES items with a 5-CAT structure. Across rating scale category effectiveness guidelines, 32 of 34 evidences (94%) provided support for this structure. Data were condensed to a 4-CAT structure by collapsing responses in Category 1 (CAT-1) and Category 2 (CAT-2). Across rating scale category effectiveness guidelines, 25 of 26 evidences (96%) provided support for this structure. Findings provided confirmatory, cross-validation evidence for both the 5-CAT and 4-CAT structures. For empirical, theoretical, and practical reasons, the authors concluded that the 4-CAT structure was preferable to the 5-CAT when CES items are used to measure coaching efficacy. This conclusion is based on the findings of this confirmatory study and the more exploratory findings of Myers, Wolfe, and Feltz (2005).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-311
Number of pages12
JournalResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Volume79
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

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Keywords

  • Coaches of youth sport
  • Rasch model
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

A confirmatory study of rating scale category effectiveness for the coaching efficacy scale. / Myers, Nicholas; Feltz, Deborah L.; Wolfe, Edward W.

In: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, Vol. 79, No. 3, 01.09.2008, p. 300-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Myers, Nicholas ; Feltz, Deborah L. ; Wolfe, Edward W. / A confirmatory study of rating scale category effectiveness for the coaching efficacy scale. In: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport. 2008 ; Vol. 79, No. 3. pp. 300-311.
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