A comparison of nine nasal continuous positive airway pressure machines in maintaining mask pressure during simulated inspiration

M. C. Demirozu, Alejandro D. Chediak, K. N. Nay, M. A. Cohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) 'splints' the airway and prevents inspiratory collapse of the upper airway in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Nine nasal CPAP machines were compared for the ability to maintain airway pressure at various simulated inspiratory flows. Each machine was connected to a vacuum system at 20, 40, and 60 L/min flow after it was initially set at test pressures of 5, 10, or 15 cm H2O and the system or 'mask' pressures were measured. In all machines, mask pressure fell during simulated inspiration and the declines in mask pressure were as high as 5 cm H2O. Because machines varied in their ability to maintain a test pressure, it is recommended that the nasal CPAP mechine used in the home be the same as that which was tested in the sleep laboratory. If a different machine is used, it may require adjustment to assure efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-262
Number of pages4
JournalSleep
Volume14
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Masks
Pressure
Aptitude
Social Adjustment
Splints
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Vacuum
Sleep

Keywords

  • nasal continuous positive airway pressure
  • sleep apnea treatment
  • sleep disordered breathing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

A comparison of nine nasal continuous positive airway pressure machines in maintaining mask pressure during simulated inspiration. / Demirozu, M. C.; Chediak, Alejandro D.; Nay, K. N.; Cohn, M. A.

In: Sleep, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.01.1991, p. 259-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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