A Comparison of Low-Income Versus Higher-Income Individuals Seeking an Online Relationship Intervention

Hannah C. Williamson, Thao T.T. Nguyen, Karen Rothman, Brian D. Doss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Compared to higher-income couples, low-income couples experience higher rates of relationship disruption, including divorce and breakup of cohabiting relationships. In recognition of this disparity in relationship outcomes, relationship interventions have increasingly been targeted at this population. However, these interventions have had limited impacts on the relationships of low-income couples. Developing interventions that are effective and responsive to the needs of low-income couples requires descriptive data on the challenges those couples perceive in their own relationships and an assessment of how their needs compare to the more affluent couples typically served by relationship interventions. The current study sampled over 5,000 individuals at the time they were seeking an online relationship intervention and compared the relationship functioning and life circumstances reported by low-income individuals to that of higher-income individuals. Results indicate that low-income individuals seeking a relationship intervention had higher levels of relationship distress (lower relationship satisfaction, more intense primary relationship problems, and less relationship stability), and had greater levels of contextual stress (more children living at home, less likely to be employed full-time, and lower levels of perceived health). Results suggest that future interventions designed to target low-income couples, as well as practitioners working with low-income couples, should be prepared to handle higher levels of relationship distress and contextual stressors than they may typically see in more affluent couples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFamily Process
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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low income
income
divorce
Divorce
Needs Assessment
Health Status
health
experience
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Keywords

  • Couple Therapy
  • Low-Income
  • Online Interventions
  • Relationship Help-Seeking
  • SES

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A Comparison of Low-Income Versus Higher-Income Individuals Seeking an Online Relationship Intervention. / Williamson, Hannah C.; Nguyen, Thao T.T.; Rothman, Karen; Doss, Brian D.

In: Family Process, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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