A comparison of jaw-closing and jaw-opening idiopathic oromandibular dystonia

Carlos Singer, Spiridon Papapetropoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a form of focal dystonia that affects masticatory, lower facial, and lingual muscles. We compared the clinical variables and response to treatment between patients with idiopathic jaw-closure C-OMD (n=11) and jaw-opening dystonia O-OMD (n=12) seen in our Movement Disorders clinic over the last 10 years. The co-existence of dystonia in other regions and sensory tricks were significantly more prevalent in O-OMD (P=0.049 and 0.03, respectively). Male gender, orobuccolingual dyskinesias (facial grimacing, lip biting, tongue dyskinesias, platysma contractions and bruxism) and better response to botulinum toxin injections were more frequent in C-OMD but remained a trend.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-118
Number of pages4
JournalParkinsonism and Related Disorders
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

Fingerprint

Dystonia
Jaw
Dyskinesias
Tongue
Bruxism
Facial Muscles
Dystonic Disorders
Botulinum Toxins
Movement Disorders
Lip
Injections

Keywords

  • Closure
  • Dystonia
  • Opening
  • Oromandibular
  • Types

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

A comparison of jaw-closing and jaw-opening idiopathic oromandibular dystonia. / Singer, Carlos; Papapetropoulos, Spiridon.

In: Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.03.2006, p. 115-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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