A college admissions game for uplink user association in wireless small cell networks

Walid Saad, Zhu Han, Rong Zheng, Mérouane Debbah, H. Vincent Poor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, the problem of uplink user association in small cell networks, which involves interactions between users, small cell base stations, and macro-cell stations, having often conflicting objectives, is considered. The problem is formulated as a college admissions game with transfers in which a number of colleges, i.e., small cell and macro-cell stations seek to recruit a number of students, i.e., users. In this game, the users and access points (small cells and macro-cells) rank one another based on preference functions that capture the users' need to optimize their utilities which are functions of packet success rate (PSR) and delay as well as the small cells' incentive to extend the macro-cell coverage (e.g., via cell biasing/range expansion) while maintaining the users' quality-of-service. A distributed algorithm that combines notions from matching theory and coalitional games is proposed to solve the game. The convergence of the algorithm is shown and the properties of the resulting assignments are discussed. Simulation results show that the proposed approach yields a performance improvement, in terms of the average utility per user, reaching up to 23% relative to a conventional, best-PSR algorithm.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE INFOCOM
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1096-1104
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9781479933600
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event33rd IEEE Conference on Computer Communications, IEEE INFOCOM 2014 - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: Apr 27 2014May 2 2014

Other

Other33rd IEEE Conference on Computer Communications, IEEE INFOCOM 2014
CountryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period4/27/145/2/14

Fingerprint

Macros
Parallel algorithms
Base stations
Quality of service
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Saad, W., Han, Z., Zheng, R., Debbah, M., & Poor, H. V. (2014). A college admissions game for uplink user association in wireless small cell networks. In Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM (pp. 1096-1104). [6848040] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/INFOCOM.2014.6848040

A college admissions game for uplink user association in wireless small cell networks. / Saad, Walid; Han, Zhu; Zheng, Rong; Debbah, Mérouane; Poor, H. Vincent.

Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2014. p. 1096-1104 6848040.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Saad, W, Han, Z, Zheng, R, Debbah, M & Poor, HV 2014, A college admissions game for uplink user association in wireless small cell networks. in Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM., 6848040, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 1096-1104, 33rd IEEE Conference on Computer Communications, IEEE INFOCOM 2014, Toronto, ON, Canada, 4/27/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/INFOCOM.2014.6848040
Saad W, Han Z, Zheng R, Debbah M, Poor HV. A college admissions game for uplink user association in wireless small cell networks. In Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2014. p. 1096-1104. 6848040 https://doi.org/10.1109/INFOCOM.2014.6848040
Saad, Walid ; Han, Zhu ; Zheng, Rong ; Debbah, Mérouane ; Poor, H. Vincent. / A college admissions game for uplink user association in wireless small cell networks. Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2014. pp. 1096-1104
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