A cluster of donor-derived Cryptococcus neoformans infection affecting lung, liver, and kidney transplant recipients: Case report and review of literature

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Donor-derived infections (DDIs) are a very rare but potentially devastating complication of solid organ transplantation. Here we present a cluster of proven donor-derived cryptococcal infection in the kidney, liver, and lung recipients from a single donor. Remarkably, the onset of illness in the kidney and liver recipients occurred more than 8-12 weeks after transplantation, which is beyond the incubation period previously reported for donor-derived cryptococcosis. DDI should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of transplant recipients admitted with febrile illness, even when presenting beyond the first month post-transplant. Communication between reference laboratories, transplant centers, and organ procurement organizations is critical to improve outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTransplant Infectious Disease
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Cryptococcus neoformans
Tissue Donors
Kidney
Lung
Liver
Infection
Transplants
Cryptococcosis
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Organ Transplantation
Differential Diagnosis
Fever
Transplantation
Communication
Transplant Recipients

Keywords

  • Cryptococcus
  • Donor-derived infection
  • Solid organ transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "A cluster of donor-derived Cryptococcus neoformans infection affecting lung, liver, and kidney transplant recipients: Case report and review of literature",
abstract = "Donor-derived infections (DDIs) are a very rare but potentially devastating complication of solid organ transplantation. Here we present a cluster of proven donor-derived cryptococcal infection in the kidney, liver, and lung recipients from a single donor. Remarkably, the onset of illness in the kidney and liver recipients occurred more than 8-12 weeks after transplantation, which is beyond the incubation period previously reported for donor-derived cryptococcosis. DDI should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of transplant recipients admitted with febrile illness, even when presenting beyond the first month post-transplant. Communication between reference laboratories, transplant centers, and organ procurement organizations is critical to improve outcomes.",
keywords = "Cryptococcus, Donor-derived infection, Solid organ transplant",
author = "{Camargo Galvis}, Jose and Jacques Simkins-Cohen and Schain, {Denise C.} and Gonzalez, {A. Adrian} and Alcaide, {Maria L} and Shweta Anjan and Giselle Guerra and David Roth and Warren Kupin and Mattiazzi, {Adela D} and Yaohong Tan and Clara Milikowski and Morris, {Michele I} and Lilian Abbo",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
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language = "English (US)",
journal = "Transplant Infectious Disease",
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T1 - A cluster of donor-derived Cryptococcus neoformans infection affecting lung, liver, and kidney transplant recipients

T2 - Case report and review of literature

AU - Camargo Galvis, Jose

AU - Simkins-Cohen, Jacques

AU - Schain, Denise C.

AU - Gonzalez, A. Adrian

AU - Alcaide, Maria L

AU - Anjan, Shweta

AU - Guerra, Giselle

AU - Roth, David

AU - Kupin, Warren

AU - Mattiazzi, Adela D

AU - Tan, Yaohong

AU - Milikowski, Clara

AU - Morris, Michele I

AU - Abbo, Lilian

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Donor-derived infections (DDIs) are a very rare but potentially devastating complication of solid organ transplantation. Here we present a cluster of proven donor-derived cryptococcal infection in the kidney, liver, and lung recipients from a single donor. Remarkably, the onset of illness in the kidney and liver recipients occurred more than 8-12 weeks after transplantation, which is beyond the incubation period previously reported for donor-derived cryptococcosis. DDI should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of transplant recipients admitted with febrile illness, even when presenting beyond the first month post-transplant. Communication between reference laboratories, transplant centers, and organ procurement organizations is critical to improve outcomes.

AB - Donor-derived infections (DDIs) are a very rare but potentially devastating complication of solid organ transplantation. Here we present a cluster of proven donor-derived cryptococcal infection in the kidney, liver, and lung recipients from a single donor. Remarkably, the onset of illness in the kidney and liver recipients occurred more than 8-12 weeks after transplantation, which is beyond the incubation period previously reported for donor-derived cryptococcosis. DDI should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of transplant recipients admitted with febrile illness, even when presenting beyond the first month post-transplant. Communication between reference laboratories, transplant centers, and organ procurement organizations is critical to improve outcomes.

KW - Cryptococcus

KW - Donor-derived infection

KW - Solid organ transplant

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