TRAINING PROGRAM IN CNS INJURY AND REPAIR

Project: Research project

Description

DESCRIPTION The mortality and morbidity associated with acute injury to the central nervous system (CNS) that occurs following stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury is a major public health problem in the United States. This new proposal, from a close-knit group of neuroscientists working in the area of acute CNS injury and repair, is to train 2 postdoctorals and 2 predoctorals to perform state-of-the-art research investigating the pathophysiology of such injuries, and developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions. The training faculty have interests in all aspects of this critical research area, including the mechanisms of neuronal injury, neuroprotection, growth factor action, physiological and behavioral sequellae of injury, axonal regeneration, and synapse formation. Drawn from both basic science departments and clinical departments (including three major neurotrauma. research centers), the faculty are an excellent group whose well-funded research comprises a cross-section of modern approaches to CNS injury research. The faculty have trained numerous graduate students (including MD/Ph.D.s), and postdocs with successful and continuing research careers. The program directors combine expertise in clinically-oriented neurotrauma research and in control of repair processes. The overall aim of the program is to guide the trainees through the process of acquiring the research skills and the intellectual rigor needed to become independent, clinically informed neuroscientists. Similarly, postdoctoral trainees accumulate new research skills and develop their abilities as independent scientists by active participation in bench research and in seminars and journal clubs. For predoctoral trainees, 36 hours of courses are required in the program of study leading to the Ph.D. degree in Neuroscience. For both predoctorals and postdoctorals, two excellent seminar series, the Neurology Grand Rounds, journal clubs, and an annual retreat provide intellectual stimulation and important training, as well as opportunities for interactions among the various disciplines. The proposed training program fulfills a serious national need and has unique strengths. Major strengths of the training program include: 1) the existence of outstanding centers and programs focused on CNS Injury and Repair, 2) the research productivity, research funding, training experience, and proven administrative capability of the program faculty in general and the Program Directors in particular, and 3) the opportunity to foster interactions between clinical and "basic" research in neurotrauma.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date7/10/006/30/10

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $201,955.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $200,412.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $44,634.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $188,470.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $38,054.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $147,763.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $82,524.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $184,381.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $103,103.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $141,238.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $201,955.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $157,004.00

Fingerprint

Central Nervous System
Education
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Nervous System Trauma
Teaching Rounds
Spinal Cord Injuries
Resistance Training
Synapses
Neurology
Neurosciences
Regeneration
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Public Health
Stroke
Students
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)