OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION IN CELL GROWTH AND DEATH

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

The key role of cytochrome c in apoptosis is widely accepted. However, the requirement of cytochrome c for
apoptosome formation has been defined mostly by in vitro assays. In vivo, cytochrome c translocation from
the mitochondria to the cytosol is an indicator of apoptosis, but this association does not address the actual
mechanism, requirements and the sequence of events leading to apoptosis. Proof of cytochrome c
requirement for in vivo apoptosis has been hampered by the lack of mutants and its dual role.
In addition, we and others have also shown that defects in oxidative phosphorylation can protect cells from
an apoptotic death Therefore, it is important to differentiate the oxidative phosphorylation effect from the
apoptosome assembly catalysis role of cytochrome c.
To better define the mechanisms associated with the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism (the mitochondrial
pathway), we propose to develop and analyze cytochrome c deficient cells and mice
These studies have far reaching implications to different areas of medical and biological research, including
cancer, neurodegeneration and development.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/15/0112/31/11

Funding

  • National Cancer Institute: $242,399.00
  • National Cancer Institute: $242,663.00
  • National Cancer Institute: $238,613.00
  • National Cancer Institute: $242,663.00
  • National Cancer Institute: $229,500.00
  • National Cancer Institute: $248,549.00
  • National Cancer Institute: $238,613.00
  • National Cancer Institute: $242,663.00
  • National Cancer Institute: $236,295.00

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