DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY OF AFFECT IN INFANTS

Project: Research project

Description

An individual's ability to modulate arousal, attend to and affectively
respond to stimulation during social interaction is critical to social
development and mental health. Disturbances in these functions have been
noted during social interactions as early as infancy. Behavioral and
psychophysiological data suggest that some infants (e.g. preterm, postterm,
Down's syndrome, autistic and hyperactive infants) may have abnormally high
or low sensory and defensive thresholds to stimulation and may have
difficulty modulating arousal, attending and positively responding except
to a very narrow range of stimulation during their early interactions. The
purpose of the proposed research is to assess this hypothesis in a number
of spontaneous and manipulated interactions by varying the type and amounts
of social stimulation, monitoring a multivariate complex of behavioral and
psychophysiological measures and using multivariate analyses to better
understand the functional significance and relationships of social
behaviors such as smiling, laughter and gaze aversion. The research will
assess both normal and high-risk infants in a longitudinal series of
studies, and in addition to describing the relationships predicted by the
model, will explore intervention strategies to facilitate arousal,
attentional and affective processes.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date5/1/812/28/02

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $102,870.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $61,697.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $84,332.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $102,060.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $41,173.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $102,870.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $99,443.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $102,870.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health

Fingerprint

Mothers
Arousal
Neurotransmitter Agents
Infant Behavior
Research
Depression
Psychophysiology
Fetal Movement
Fetal Heart Rate
Electroencephalography
Interpersonal Relations
Sleep
Maternal Behavior
Maternal Deprivation
Dopamine
Norepinephrine
Massage
Temperament
Technology
Laughter

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)