COSTS AND BENEFITS OF ALCOHOL SERVICES &INTERVENTIONS

Project: Research project

Description

Despite considerable methodological and empirical developments in economic assessment of primary health care programs, economic evaluation techniques are not systematically adopted in studies of behavioral health care, especially addiction interventions. Compared to other health care areas, evaluation of addiction interventions is also particularly complex due to the diversity of delivery systems, the perplexity of the financing schemes, and the wide spectrum of social and economic outcomes. With the continuing need for more and improved economic evaluation findings for alcohol abuse services and interventions, the present project will address the following three broad aims: 1. Examine whether recently developed methods to estimate the economic costs and benefits of drug abuse services and interventions can be utilized in evaluation studies of alcohol abuse services and interventions; 2. Make any modifications and/or enhancements to customize these earlier developed methodologies and instruments for use in current studies of alcohol abuse services and interventions; 3. Test the practicality and scientific integrity of using these contemporary economic evaluation methods for alcohol abuse services and interventions by adding (or supplementing) an economic evaluation component to several NIAAA-funded services research and intervention projects in Arkansas, California, Florida, Illinois, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. The proposed study will complement and extend an existing research grant with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), which focuses on developing and testing economic evaluation methods for drug abuse interventions, including the application of clinical and financial instruments in economic evaluation (e.g., ASI, DATCAP, TSR) (1R01 DA11506). Since the start of the grant in September 1998, various economic evaluation methods have been developed, empirically tested, and implemented. Presumably, most of the methods can be applied to alcohol abuse services and interventions as well. To provide an empirical laboratory for testing these methods, the investigative team for the proposed study has assembled an impressive group of NIAAA grantees that have offered access to outcome and other data from their current projects for the purposes of adding (or improving) an economic evaluation component to their research studies. Since the demand for economic evaluation studies of alcohol abuse services and interventions is increasing in the U.S. as well as abroad, the proposed study holds important potential to assist researchers, policymakers, and program directors with economic evaluation guidelines and "real world" applications.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date6/1/015/31/08

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $513,517.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $518,155.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $542,673.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $558,803.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $527,017.00

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Cost-Benefit Analysis
Alcohols
Alcoholism
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (U.S.)
Organized Financing
Substance-Related Disorders
National Institute on Drug Abuse (U.S.)
Economics
Research
Delivery of Health Care
Economic Development
Program Evaluation
Primary Health Care
Research Personnel
Guidelines